Search results for lawsuits

  • Solana Could Face Lawsuits After Hack

    Lawyers from an international firm say that if the hack is found to have been due to a code error, developers and external service providers would be held legally accountable. Continue reading Solana Could Face Lawsuits After Hack at DailyCoin.com.

  • Coinbase Made 'False and Misleading Statements' About Its Business, Lawsuits Allege

    America’s largest crypto exchange is facing two more class action lawsuits over the losses suffered by investors in the company’s stock.

  • Coinbase Turns to Supreme Court to Settle Lawsuits From Account Holders

    Coinbase has reportedly asked the U.S. Supreme Court for an emergency intervention to send two recently filed lawsuits to arbitration.

  • Coinbase Asks Supreme Court To Halt User Lawsuits Relating Dogecoin And Scammers

    Crypto exchange Coinbase Global Inc (NASDAQ: COIN) has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to halt two lawsuits filed by users of the crypto exchange. What Happened: Coinbase said the trial court proceedings for two separate cases filed by users should be stopped until the exchange presses its appeal at the San Francisco-based 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday. The first case — Bielski v. Coinbase, 22A91 — was filed by Abraham Bielski in April after he lost $31,000 when a scammer gained access to his Coinbase account. Bielski fell victim to the scam after being contacted by an individual pretending to be a PayPal Holdings Inc (NASDAQ: PYPL) representative.  The Coinbase user claims that the company did not help in reclaiming the stolen funds and violated the Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E. The second case — Suski v. Coinbase — is a class action lawsuit filed by lead plaintiff David Suski, alleging that Coinbase violated consumer law and misled investors by holding a $1.2 million Dogecoin (CRYPTO: DOGE) sweepstakes without adequate disclosures. “Opt in and then buy or sell $100 in DOGE on Coinbase by 6/10/2021 for your chance to win,” read the ad for the program, leading customers to believe that they had to buy or sell $100 worth of DOGE in order to participate. Federal trial judges in both cases have rejected Coinbase’s bid to send the cases to arbitration, as per the report. Price Action: Coinbase shares traded 1.13% lower after hours on Wednesday, as per data from Benzinga Pro. © 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • You Can Now File Lawsuits Via NFT Airdrop In The UK: What Does This Mean?

    Fabrizio D'Aloia, the founder of the Italian online gambling business Micrograme, has been given permission by the High Court of England and Wales to use an NFT drop to file lawsuits against defendants who prefer to remain anonymous, according to CoinDesk. What Happened: D'Aloia claimed to have been duped by an online brokerage to deposit more than 2.1 million Tether (CRYPTO: USDT) and 230,000 USD Coin (CRYPTO: USDC) worth about $2.33 million into two different digital wallets that proved to be fake. The unprecedented action aims to combat cryptocurrency scams and will enable D'Aloia to submit the court proceedings to individuals who are connected to two digital wallets but remain anonymous. Why It Matters: A digital wallet address and the specifics of each cryptocurrency transaction are stored in the blockchain with transactions remaining anonymous as long as there is no connection between a digital wallet address and an identity. With permission granted by the court, D'Aloia can now deliver the court paperwork through an NFT airdrop to the two digital wallets and file a lawsuit against who owns them. “This is so important because it shows the courts' willingness to adapt to new technologies and embrace the blockchain and actually step in to help consumers where previous legislation and regulators simply could not do that,” Joanna Bailey, a lawyer at Giambrone & Partners LLP told CoinDesk. Crypto airdrops began in 2014 when Auroracoin (CRYPTO: AUR), the proposed cryptocurrency for Iceland, was airdropped to each citizen who submitted their national ID. Since then, airdrops have become increasingly popular with the Bored Ape Yacht Club, an NFT collection, airdropping 10,000 ApeCoin (CRYPTO: APE) to every Bored Ape owner in addition to other NFTs within the Bored Ape ecosystem. Photo: Golden Sikorka via Shutterstock Original publication July 13, 2022     © 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • Multiple Lawsuits Filed Against TerraForm Labs and Accomplices

    Class action complaint was filed by Bragar Eagel & Squire PC against the defendants. South Korean authorities raided 15 crypto

  • See You in Court, Anon: UK Judge Allows Lawsuits via NFT Airdrop

    A U.K. court has ruled that individuals and entities can now be served legal documents via NFTs. But the jury's out on the method's efficacy.

  • UK Court Allows Filing Lawsuits Via NFT Airdrop: What Does This Mean?

    Fabrizio D'Aloia, the founder of the Italian online gambling business Micrograme, has been given permission by the High Court of England and Wales to use an NFT drop to file lawsuits against defendants who prefer to remain anonymous, according to CoinDesk. What Happened: D'Aloia claimed to have been duped by an online brokerage to deposit more than 2.1 million Tether (CRYPTO: USDT) and 230,000 USD Coin (CRYPTO: USDC) worth about $2.33 million into two different digital wallets that proved to be fake. The unprecedented action aims to combat cryptocurrency scams and will enable D'Aloia to submit the court proceedings to individuals who are connected to two digital wallets but remain anonymous. Why It Matters: A digital wallet address and the specifics of each cryptocurrency transaction are stored in the blockchain with transactions remaining anonymous as long as there is no connection between a digital wallet address and an identity. With permission granted by the court, D'Aloia can now deliver the court paperwork through an NFT airdrop to the two digital wallets and file a lawsuit against who owns them. “This is so important because it shows the courts' willingness to adapt to new technologies and embrace the blockchain and actually step in to help consumers where previous legislation and regulators simply could not do that,” Joanna Bailey, a lawyer at Giambrone & Partners LLP told CoinDesk. Crypto airdrops began in 2014 when Auroracoin (CRYPTO: AUR), the proposed cryptocurrency for Iceland, was airdropped to each citizen who submitted their national ID. Since then, airdrops have become increasingly popular with the Bored Ape Yacht Club, an NFT collection, airdropping 10,000 ApeCoin (CRYPTO: APE) to every Bored Ape owner in addition to other NFTs within the Bored Ape ecosystem. Photo: Golden Sikorka via Shutterstock       © 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • End of Elon Musk’s Twitter Saga? Lawsuits, Price Falls, & Distrust

    On July 8, Elon Musk terminated the merger agreement with Twitter. Twitter’s Chairman threatens to sue Musk as a result. ...Read More...

  • To combat $10 lawsuits, DeFi App PoolTogether sells $830,000 in NFTs

    PoolTogether, a DeFi savings program, raised over $830,000 in five days through an NFT sale to pay its legal defense against a man who put $10 into the protocol and then went on to sue the company behind it for assisting an “unauthorized lottery scam.” The DeFi App PoolTogether has raised $830,000. The bitcoin community […] The post To combat $10 lawsuits, DeFi App PoolTogether sells $830,000 in NFTs appeared first on NFT News Today.

  • Lawsuits aimed at recouping UST/Luna losses test uncharted waters

    Quick Take A major South Korean law firm, LKB & Partners, is suing Do Kwon and co-founder Daniel Shin on behalf of five investors. Other investors are also organizing online to launch their own lawsuits; we may end up seeing cases centered around whether TFL represented its products and the risks of investing accurately.